Soldering wheel spoke crossings

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Soldering wheel spoke crossings

Postby yuehchiehliu4 » Thu Oct 17, 2013 7:51 pm

Just found out recently that there was an old trick that isn't common anymore to make wheels stiffer and stay true longer by soldering the spokes crossings together...supposly.
IMO opinions or comments from people who have never tried it is pretty meaningless. (Sorta like people bad mouth on belt drive bikes but never ridden one before...but that's off topic).
Anyone who actually tried it willing to share their experiences?
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Re: Soldering wheel spoke crossings

Postby bholwell » Thu Oct 17, 2013 10:36 pm

Likely a lot of effort for minimal to no gains.

http://sheldonbrown.com/brandt/tied-soldered.html
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Re: Soldering wheel spoke crossings

Postby GTscoob » Fri Oct 18, 2013 11:05 am

Want a stiffer wheel? Run a stiffer rim and straight gauge spokes, or more spokes.

Tying and soldering is definitely something that gets you cool points from the bike nerds and looks great on show bikes but you also sacrifice the ability to change a spoke out when one breaks inevitably.
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Re: Soldering wheel spoke crossings

Postby dgaddis1 » Thu Nov 07, 2013 1:44 pm

GTscoob wrote:Want a stiffer wheel? Run a stiffer rim and straight gauge spokes, or more spokes.

Tying and soldering is definitely something that gets you cool points from the bike nerds and looks great on show bikes but you also sacrifice the ability to change a spoke out when one breaks inevitably.


^^this

It was originally used on track bikes way-back-when components (like spokes) were crap and prone to breaking. Tying them together kept broken spokes from flopping around. There's no real reason to do it now, manufacturing and materials now allow for well built wheels to last pretty much forever, so long as you don't hit a tree and full speed on run one over at the trailhead or something like that.
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