Hand saw

Discuss trail design, construction and maintenance. Enter the amazing world of Pulaskis, McLeods, Stihls, Dingos, and SWECOs

Postby commander » Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:17 pm

tmknight wrote:This is the coolest compact saw I've ever seen used: http://www.pocketchainsaw.com/

There are vaiants that are smaller and work well but will depend on what you plan on cutting through. But the chain saw style is the thing you want.

T


That's what I have. So Does Furrner. Can cut a larger tree than the folding saw and fits any where for carrying around.
-Trey
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Postby Tar Heel Rider » Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:21 pm

OK, I guess I could call those guys to find out, but I'll ask one more time.

How much?!? :roll: :wink:
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Postby commander » Wed Oct 17, 2007 11:23 pm

http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/store ... &langId=-1

$25. I got mine for Christmas from Furrner.
-Trey
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Postby tmknight » Thu Oct 18, 2007 12:59 am

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Postby Tar Heel Rider » Thu Oct 18, 2007 8:09 am

Thanks Trey and tm.

Not a bad price. I expected more.

You think they make bicycle chains?!? :wink:
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Postby K2K » Thu Oct 18, 2007 8:43 am

Tar Heel Rider wrote:Whoa! That's a serious tool. Never seen that before. 8O

How much?


+1, I might have to switch from the Gerber, That looks like I could get the whole trunk off the trail... I normally just clear the strainers ...But I dont like to clear trunks... Just because I can't ride it, doesn't mean someone else cannot. I have seen ring grind marks on trunks I could never (well never say never) get over.
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Postby Eddie O » Thu Oct 18, 2007 10:45 am

I used the folding style for the Fool's Gold clean up, but it wears you out fast. Some of the stuff up on Bare Hare required several cuts to remove the trees. I used to have a pocket chainsaw and may have to see if I still do. Those do work well and require a lot less energy.

Right now the only downed trees I know of are:
On the two track section of No Tell. Not far from FS28. My dad & I started on it with a bow saw the day before the Fool's Gold, but after an hour of effort it was going to be part of the course.

Moss Branch Creek has at least 2 down that will need a chain saw. Both have routes around them, but it would be good to clear them.

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Postby jag3 » Thu Oct 18, 2007 11:03 am

Landed late but- these work well with the right blade, if you can carry it. Great for up to 5" cuts given the right blade.

Image
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Postby Tar Heel Rider » Thu Oct 18, 2007 11:27 am

This lightweight little number is just the tool for all you riders who like to carry something just in case you come across a downed tree, like a 100 year old oak or a small redwood.

Image


8) :lol:
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Postby DaMtnRider » Thu Oct 18, 2007 12:59 pm

A tree company we hired was using one of the pocket chainsaw for a few single limbs that were up high. They didn't want to spike the tree so they used a longer rope and threw up over the limb and sawed right through. Thinking of getting a few of these for xmas gifts
Allen
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Postby Schaarschmidt » Thu Oct 18, 2007 3:20 pm

tym2ride wrote:This works great. Gerber as mentioned before. Comes with two blades, one course and one fine tooth. I got one - word of advice, watch your body parts with this one. :twisted: It doesn't care if it's wood or flesh!!!!

Image



I have seen and used a few different saws. I currently have to agree with others here. The Gerber has the best blade by-far. Additionally, if you bend or otherwise screw up the blade you can purchase a replacement blade, instead of having to purchase a whole new saw.

Image
Gerber blade in action at Fall Creek Falls State Park in TN.


I think the key thing to remember, a folding saw if great to remove the odd tree you find down across the trail,during the course of your ride. If there are a lot of trees it is best use a BOB and haul in a chainsaw.
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Re:

Postby darbrednew » Sun Sep 07, 2008 9:31 pm

Tar Heel Rider wrote:This lightweight little number is just the tool for all you riders who like to carry something just in case you come across a downed tree, like a 100 year old oak or a small redwood.

Image


8) :lol:


I love my Stihl, but even sometimes my 20" bar isnt enough. My other chainsaw can accomodate even a 28 or 32" bar, but that will weigh as much as my mtn bike to carry around the forrest.
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Re: Hand saw

Postby Eddie O » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:23 am

I picked one of these up for some projects near the house:

Image

It's about 8 lbs with the lithium ion battery. With a 10" blade it's not for big jobs, but it's good enough to cut up the little trees to build log-over on the huge ones.

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Re: Hand saw

Postby iride » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:30 am

Eddie O wrote:I picked one of these up for some projects near the house:

Image

It's about 8 lbs with the lithium ion battery. With a 10" blade it's not for big jobs, but it's good enough to cut up the little trees to build log-over on the huge ones.

Eddie O


atta boy...

and congrats on taking FM, bro. you rock.
clearly it's entirely too technical...

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Re: Hand saw

Postby heimy » Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:32 am

Eddie O wrote:I picked one of these up for some projects near the house:

Image

It's about 8 lbs with the lithium ion battery. With a 10" blade it's not for big jobs, but it's good enough to cut up the little trees to build log-over on the huge ones.

Eddie O

take it apart and all your buddies can carry part of it.
I have a folder and we all take turns working on large cuts. They are great to have for everyday rides in the mountains. We do a lot of trail work with it. Many areas you can NOT use a chain saw unless you have a forest service course and permission from the land manager.
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