Advanced Level Trails

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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby kpvsr » Mon May 11, 2009 4:58 pm

I was hoping to leave particular trails out of the discussion but since they have been mentioned I would also agree with the assessment of Blankets being at most intermediate. I would be curious to see what the average grade of Van Michael is though.

I like the UK idea of adding a 'red' designation for physically demanding.

I do not agree with labeling trails based on area or even worse just the system as when one decides to venture out away from the home trail one could get in real trouble or be really disappointed.

I firmly believe we all should adhere to the IMBA guidelines and have those guidelines posted on trail head kiosks so people become aware of what they actually are. I think IMBA should also adopt the 'red' designation into their guidlines.
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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby Tweety » Mon May 11, 2009 5:08 pm

kpvsr wrote:I was hoping to leave particular trails out of the discussion but since they have been mentioned I would also agree with the assessment of Blankets being at most intermediate. I would be curious to see what the average grade of Van Michael is though.

I like the UK idea of adding a 'red' designation for physically demanding.

I do not agree with labeling trails based on area or even worse just the system as when one decides to venture out away from the home trail one could get in real trouble or be really disappointed.

I firmly believe we all should adhere to the IMBA guidelines and have those guidelines posted on trail head kiosks so people become aware of what they actually are. I think IMBA should also adopt the 'red' designation into their guidlines.


+1.

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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby mtnbikerider » Mon May 11, 2009 10:23 pm

I don't agree with the IMBA standards for trail width. At Blanket's Mosquito has some bridges and other sections under 36" so under their classification it would be intermediate. Also the South Loop and Van Michael have sections under 24" which IMBA classifies as Advanced.
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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby Lisa » Tue May 12, 2009 8:12 am

What's techinical?

In my opinion, a technical trail has lower-percentage trail features that I may not be able to ride every single time. There should be features that those with good handling skills can't ride the first time through and have to work at. Another good rule of thumb is if something scares me (for example, a super-steep downhill full of babyheads) then I'd consider that technical too. Rock drop offs over 12 inches, rockgardens with no apparent line through them...all good technical features.

I remember a section of trail at the Alpine Valley, Wisconsin NORBA race several years back...it was called the "cheese grater." It was a 100' rock garden on a slight downhill that didn't have any obvious lines through it...oh, and it was muddy. I only saw ONE pro guy who actually stayed on his bike the entire way through.

I don't really care for man-made TTF's - so sticking some rocks in the dirt at Blankets that almost anyone can roll over and calling it a TTF is a far cry from the actual thing. I'd say all of those are intermediate at best based on trails in the area, but if you compare them to some other areas/states, they are all pretty easy.
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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby iride » Tue May 12, 2009 8:25 am

Lisa wrote:What's techinical?

In my opinion, a technical trail has lower-percentage trail features that I may not be able to ride every single time. There should be features that those with good handling skills can't ride the first time through and have to work at. Another good rule of thumb is if something scares me (for example, a super-steep downhill full of babyheads) then I'd consider that technical too. Rock drop offs over 12 inches, rockgardens with no apparent line through them...all good technical features.

I remember a section of trail at the Alpine Valley, Wisconsin NORBA race several years back...it was called the "cheese grater." It was a 100' rock garden on a slight downhill that didn't have any obvious lines through it...oh, and it was muddy. I only saw ONE pro guy who actually stayed on his bike the entire way through.

I don't really care for man-made TTF's - so sticking some rocks in the dirt at Blankets that almost anyone can roll over and calling it a TTF is a far cry from the actual thing. I'd say all of those are intermediate at best based on trails in the area, but if you compare them to some other areas/states, they are all pretty easy.


key statement.
clearly it's entirely too technical...

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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby RamX » Tue May 12, 2009 11:30 am

Fruita Co. Kokopelli's Trail Horsethief Bench Entry from Marys loop (Double Black Diamond) I made the first couple drops at the very top then walked the rest.
Image

Fruita Co. Kokopelli's Trail Horsethief Bench (Black Diamond). This section was not to bad.
Image
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Re: Advanced Level Trails

Postby brially » Tue May 12, 2009 1:03 pm

RamX wrote:Fruita Co. Kokopelli's Trail Horsethief Bench Entry from Marys loop (Double Black Diamond) I made the first couple drops at the very top then walked the rest.
Image

Fruita Co. Kokopelli's Trail Horsethief Bench (Black Diamond). This section was not to bad.
Image


Nice! Fruita is on my must visit list.

That's about the technicality of most blacks and double blacks I've ridden around the world. This kind of natural technical terrain is about in GA it just isn't being exploited yet.

A black trail should have sections that make 80% - 90% of the riders out there test their limits. You should need Skills to ride a double black and most of us will be walking sections.
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